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On Our Resistance to Restorative Justice: Perpetrator Memories and Trans-Generational Trauma is a Course

On Our Resistance to Restorative Justice: Perpetrator Memories and Trans-Generational Trauma

Started Feb 22, 2021

$25 Enroll

Full course description

Monday, February 22, 2021 | 7-8pm (EST)-- Fully Online Lecture

Eligible for 1 CE for LMHCs, Psychologists, and Social Workers

Cost:

This event is free to the public, please use the promotional code ETHICSERIES8 to register at no cost.

This event is $25 for practitioners seeking CEs for this lecture. Once you have registered for the class, your CE registration status is fixed and can not be adjusted at a later time. 

Description:

Restorative justice is a healing project, a humanizing dialogue between perpetrators and victims. Offering radical listening to the wounded, this dialogue can awaken reflectivity and reparative guilt in the perpetrator. These practices can disrupt our repetitive cycles of violence and vengeance. Nonetheless, U.S. culture clings to harsh, shame-inducing models of crime and punishment that invite the renewal of violence. Why don’t we embrace a more healing model? This lecture will suggest that U.S colonial labor history yielded a particular forgotten form of inter-generational transmission: a fusion of victim/perpetrator states that we know as ‘white grievance’.

Learning Objectives:

After this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. describe restorative justice principles, in distinction from current criminal justice models 
  2. contrast historical/psychoanalytic understandings of inherited victim/perpetrator states that inhibit a cultural turn towards restorative justice.

Timeline and Requirements:

The course will take place on Monday, February 22, 2021. This lecture is presenter-led and will be conducted synchronously online via Zoom from 7-8 p.m. EST. 

CE Sponsorship: 

University Counseling Services of Boston College is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. As a co-sponsor of this program, University Counseling Services of Boston College maintains responsibility for this program and its content." Participants will be eligible to receive 1 CE units from University Counseling Services of Boston College. 

The Lynch School of Education and Human Development is providing sponsorship for CEUs for Licensed Mental Health Counselors (LMHC). Participants will be eligible to receive 1 CE unit. These credits are accepted by the Massachusetts Board of Registration for Licensed Mental Health Counselors (Category I contact hours in Content Area I).

The Boston College School of Social Work is providing CEUs for Licensed Social Workers. This program has been approved for 1.0 CEU Social Work Continuing Education hours for relicensure, in accordance with 258 CMR. Collaborative of NASW and the Boston College School of Social Work Authorization Number A003.21.

Participants must attend the lecture in full and complete the post event survey to be eligible to receive CEs.

This lecture does not offer CEs for other clinicians not listed above. 

Fees & Policies:

This event is free if you are NOT seeking CEs towards your license. If you plan on seeking CEs for this lecture, the cost is $25. Once you have registered for the class, your CE registration status is fixed and can not be adjusted at a later time.  

Payment is due by credit card at registration. Registration closes February 22nd at 5pm. Refunds will be granted only up to the time of the lecture. 

Presenter:


Dr. Sue Grand is a Faculty member and Supervisor at the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis; Faculty member in the Trauma Program at the National Institute for the Psychotherapies; Faculty member at the Mitchell Center for Relational Studies; Fellow at the Institute for Psychology and the Other; and a  Visiting Scholar at the Psychoanalytic Institute of Northern California. She is an Associate Editor of Psychoanalytic Dialogues and Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society. She is the author of The Reproduction of Evil: A Clinical and Cultural Perspective and The Hero in the Mirror: From Fear to Fortitude. She is a co-editor, with Jill Salberg, of The Wounds of History: Repair and Resilience in the Transgenerational Transmission of Trauma and Transgenerational Transmission and the Other: Dialogues Across History and Difference. She is also in private practice in New York City and in Teaneck, NJ.